API Introduction

CloudAPI exposes a REST API over HTTPS. You can work with the REST API by either calling it directly via tooling you already know about (such as curl, et al), or by using the CloudAPI CLIs and SDKs from Joyent. The node-triton CloudAPI SDK & CLI is available as an npm module, which you can install with:

npm install triton

Alternatively, there is the more stable and feature-complete node-smartdc:

npm install smartdc

Although node-triton has fewer features -- for now -- it will continue to receive the most development effort and future support. node-smartdc is in maintenance.

The rest of this document will show all APIs in terms of both the raw HTTP specification, the CLI commands, and sometimes the node-smartdc SDK.

Issuing Requests

All HTTP calls to CloudAPI must be made over TLS, and requests must carry at least two headers (in addition to standard HTTP headers): Authorization and Api-Version. The details are explained below. In addition to these headers, any requests requiring content must be sent in an acceptable scheme to CloudAPI. Details are also below.

Content-Type

For requests requiring content, you can send parameters encoded with application/json, application/x-www-form-urlencoded or multipart/form-data. Joyent recommends application/json. The value of the Accept header determines the encoding of content returned in responses. CloudAPI supports application/json response encodings only.

For example, all of the following are valid calls:

Query String (on the uri):

POST /my/keys?name=rsa&key=... HTTP/1.1
Host: joyent.com
Authorization: ...
Content-Length: 0

Form encoded in the body:

POST /my/keys HTTP/1.1
Host: joyent.com
Authorization: ...
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded
Content-Length: 123
name=rsa&key=...

JSON in the body:

POST /my/keys HTTP/1.1
Host: joyent.com
Authorization: ...
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: 123
{"name":"rsa","key":"..."}

Authorization

All API calls to CloudAPI require an Authorization header, which supports multiple "schemes". Currently CloudAPI supports only one Authentication mechanism due to PCI compliance restrictions:

  • HTTP Signature Authentication Scheme. This Scheme is outlined in Appendix B.

In order to leverage HTTP Signature Authentication, only RSA signing mechanisms are supported, and your keyId must be equal to the path returned from a ListKeys API call. For example, if your Triton login is demo, and you've uploaded an RSA SSH key with the name foo, an Authorization header would look like:

Authorization: Signature keyId=/demo/keys/foo,algorithm="rsa-sha256" ${Base64(sign($Date))}

The default value to sign for CloudAPI requests is simply the value of the HTTP Date header. For more information on the Date header value, see RFC 2616. All requests to CloudAPI using the Signature authentication scheme must send a Date header. Note that clock skew will be enforced to within 300 seconds (positive or negative) from the value sent.

Full support for the HTTP Signature Authentication scheme is provided in both CloudAPI SDKs; an additional reference implementation for Node.js is available in the npm http-signature module, which you can install with:

npm install http-signature

Using cURL with CloudAPI

Since cURL is commonly used to script requests to web services, here's a simple Bash function you can use to wrap cURL when communicating with CloudAPI:

function cloudapi() {
local now=$(date -u '+%a, %d %h %Y %H:%M:%S GMT')
local signature=$(echo -n "$now" | openssl dgst -sha256 -sign ~/.ssh/id_rsa | openssl enc -e -a | tr -d '\n')
local url="$SDC_URL$1"
shift
curl -s -k -i \
-H 'Accept: application/json' \
-H "accept-version: ~8" \
-H "Date: $now" \
-H "Authorization: Signature keyId=\"/$SDC_ACCOUNT/keys/id_rsa\",algorithm=\"rsa-sha256\" $signature" \
"$@" "$url"
echo
}

You may need to alter the path to your SSH key in the above function, as well as the path its public-key is saved under in Triton.

With that function, you could just do:

cloudapi /my/machines

CloudAPI HTTP Responses

CloudAPI returns all response objects as application/json encoded HTTP bodies. In addition to the JSON body, all responses have the following headers:

Header

Description

Date

When the response was sent (RFC 1123 format)

Api-Version

The exact version of the CloudAPI server you spoke with

Request-Id

A unique id for this request; you should log this

Response-Time

How long the server took to process your request (ms)

If there is content, you can expect:

Header

Description

Content-Length

How much content, in bytes

Content-Type

Formatting of the response (almost always application/json)

Content-MD5

An MD5 checksum of the response; you should check this

HTTP Status Codes

Your client should check for each of the following status codes from any API request:

Code

Description

Details

400

Bad Request

Invalid HTTP Request

401

Unauthorized

Either no Authorization header was sent, or invalid credentials were used

403

Forbidden

No permissions to the specified resource

404

Not Found

Resource was not found

405

Method Not Allowed

Method not supported for the given resource

406

Not Acceptable

Try sending a different Accept header

409

Conflict

Most likely invalid or missing parameters

413

Request Entity Too Large

You sent too much data

415

Unsupported Media Type

Request was encoded in a format CloudAPI does not understand

420

Slow Down

You're sending too many requests too quickly

449

Retry With

Invalid Version header; try with a different Api-Version string

500

Internal Error

An unexpected error occurred; see returned message for more details.

503

Service Unavailable

Either there's no capacity in this datacenter, or it's in a maintenance window

Error Responses

In the event of an error, CloudAPI will return a standard JSON error response object in the body with the scheme:

{
"code": "CODE",
"message": "human readable string"
}

Where the code element is one of:

Code

Description

BadRequest

You sent bad HTTP

InternalError

Something went wrong in Triton

InUseError

The object is in use and cannot be operated on

InvalidArgument

You sent bad arguments or a bad value for an argument

InvalidCredentials

Authentication failed

InvalidHeader

You sent a bad HTTP header

InvalidVersion

You sent a bad Api-Version string

MissingParameter

You didn't send a required parameter

NotAuthorized

You don't have access to the requested resource

RequestThrottled

You were throttled

RequestTooLarge

You sent too much request data

RequestMoved

HTTP Redirect

ResourceNotFound

What you asked for wasn't found

UnknownError

Something completely unexpected happened!

Clients are expected to check HTTP status code first, and if it's in the 4xx range, they can leverage the codes above.